Should all companies that profit also pay taxes?

While the United States has the highest corporate tax rate in the world, there are provisions in the tax code that allow American businesses to defer or avoid tax responsibilities. In 2017, a national tax break lowered the corporate tax rate by 14% and made it notably easier for corporations to reduce their tax burden. Supporters insist that low taxes encourage corporations to build their businesses in America, resulting in economic growth, more jobs, and higher wages. Opponents disagree, stating that big businesses rarely use tax breaks to reinvest in communities and point to the existing wealth gap as evidence. Should the U.S. audit the corporate tax code?

investigate

Economist Takes Deep Dive Into The Effects of Slashing Corporate Taxes

After 2 Years, Trump Tax Cuts Have Failed To Deliver On GOP's Promises

Additional resources to think about

Tax The Ultrarich To Solve Poverty? Easier Said Than Done
This NPR Goats and Soda article discusses whether a 0.5% tax rate on the wealthy would solve financial inequality.

For Many Companies, Low Taxes Are The Key To Profits
NPR investigates the current tax system and how companies are able to find loopholes to avoid paying taxes.

A Q&A with Professor Zachary Liscow on Corporate Tax Rates
Yale's Associate Professor of Law explains how higher corporate taxes would close the deficit and reduce inequality.

Corporate tax in 5 1/2 minutes | KPMG
This video from Dutch accounting firm KPMG explains taxes, what corporate tax is, and how governments treat corporate taxes differently, especially in a global economy.

Corporations go overseas to avoid U.S. taxes
This video from PBS NewsHour explains how large scale corporations have used foreign entities to aboid the current tax system.

FACT CHECK: Does The U.S. Have The Highest Corporate Tax Rate In The World?
NPR investigates the claim that the U.S. has the highest corporate tax rate globally.

Lesson Plan: US Tax Rates Compared to Other Countries
This lesson plan from C-SPAN Classroom helps students examine the tax burden in the United States and how it compares to other countries around the world.

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